Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona executive summary

Cover of: Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona |

Published by Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Open-File Reports Section in Tucson, Ariz, Denver, Colo .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Sediment transport -- Colorado River Watershed (Colo.-Mexico),
  • Sedimentation and deposition -- Colorado River Watershed (Colo.-Mexico),
  • Grand Canyon National Park (Ariz.).

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementRobert H. Webb ; prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.
SeriesU.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 87-117.
ContributionsUnited States. Bureau of Reclamation., Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17673508M

Download Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Distributed along km of river between the Paria River and the Grand Wash Cliffs, debris flow producing tributaries of the Colorado River dr km 2 of steep terrain in Grand Canyon.

DEBRIS FLOWS FROM TRIBUTARIES OF THE COLORADO RIVER, GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, ARIZONA: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY By Robert H. Webb ABSTRACT Debris flows are a major process of sediment transport to the Colorado River from ungaged tributaries in Grand Canyon National Arizona book, Arizona.

Debris flows are slurries of clay- to boulder-sized particles ofCited by: 1. A reconnaissance of 36 tributaries of the Colorado River indicates that debris flows are a major process by which sediment is transported to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

Debris flows are slurries of sediment and water that have a water content of less than about 40 percent by volume. Get this from a library. Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. [Robert H Webb; Patrick T Pringle; Glenn R Rink; United States.

Bureau of Reclamation.]. Get this from a library. Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. [Robert H Webb; Patrick T Pringle; Glenn R Rink; Geological Survey (U.S.),; United States.

Bureau of Reclamation.]. Get this from a library. Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: executive summary. [Robert H Webb; United States. Bureau of. By ROBERT H. WEBB, PATRICK T. PRINGLE, and GLENN R. RINK. ABSTRACT. A reconnaissance of 36 tributaries of the Colorado River indicates that debris flows are a major process by which sediment Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River transported to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National by: [1] The Colorado River in Grand Canyon has long been known as a ‘‘rapids-and-pools’’ river, with the rapids owing their existence primarily to tributary debris flows.

TheCited by: A recent debris flow in Monument Creek illustrates the nature of debris flows in small tributaries and their hydrologic effects on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. A debris avalanche originated in the Permian Esplanade Sandstone of the Supai Group during intense rainfall on Jand fell m into Monument Creek Cited by: Half of the vertical drop of the Colorado River occurs in rapids, which account for only 10 percent of the river’s length through Grand Canyon (Leopold, ).

By forming rapids, debris flows define the longitudinal profile and control the geomorphic framework of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Debris flows from tributaries in Grand Canyon, Arizona, transport coarse-grained sediment onto debris fans adjacent to the Colorado River. These debris fans constrict the river to form rapids.

1] Debris flows from tributaries transport sediment into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, creating rapids that control its longitudinal profile. A reconnaissance of 36 tributaries of the Colorado River indicates that debris flows are a major process by which sediment is transported to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

[1] Debris flows from tributaries transport sediment into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, creating rapids that control its longitudinal profile. Debris flows mostly occur when runoff triggers failures in colluvium by a process termed ‘‘the fire hose effect.’’ Debris flows originate from a limited number of geologic strata, almostCited by: Get this from a library.

Debris flows from Arizona book of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. [Robert H Webb; Patrick T Pringle; Glenn R Rink; United States. Bureau of Reclamation.; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Debris flows are recurrent sediment-transport processes in tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon.

Arizona. Initiated by slope failures in bedrock and (or) colluvium during intense rainfall, Grand Canyon debris flows are high-magnitude, short-duration floods.

Debris flows in at least Grand Canyon tributaries transport poorly-sorted clayto boulder-sized sediment into the Colorado River, and are initiated by failures in weathered bedrock, the "fire. Debris flows from tributaries transport sediment into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, creating rapids that control its longitudinal profile.

Debris flows mostly occur when runoff triggers failures in colluvium by a process termed "the fire hose effect." Debris flows originate from a limited number of geologic strata, almost exclusively shales or other clay-rich, fine-grained Cited by: Debris flows occur in tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon between Lees Ferry and Diamond Creek, Arizona (river miles 0 to ).

An episodic type of flash flood, debris flows transport poorly-sorted sediment ranging in size from clay to boulders into the Colorado River. management of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

The debris fans formed by dep­ osition of coarse-grained sediment in the river channel by fan-forming debris flows, which were substantially larger than most recent debris flows.

These large debris flows were capable of severely constricting the main-Cited by: 1. Debris flows occur in tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona when intense precipitation causes slope failures in bedrock or colluvium. These slurries transport poorly sorted sediment, including very large boulders that form rapids at the mouths of tributaries and control the longitudinal profile of the Colorado River.

Table 1. Frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona Debris flows Tributaries in sample Percent of Tributaries per year Debris flows per year Sample Population No debris flows Total population Debris flows Sample Population a scale of a second set of unre- lated photographs, taken in November.

Even though the Colorado River is down cutting the Grand Canyon at a slow rate year after year, much of the major erosion is due to debris flows and rock fall. Gravity forces rocks to fall down along the cliffs and slopes of sides of the canyons at faster rates than water can, both all processes create the canyon we see today.

extensive National Park trip - Grand Canyon, Antelope Canyon South Rim GC, Utah National Parks, Mesa Verde Itinerary Xanterra Grand Canyon hotels extends closure to 06/14/20 Melis, T.S.,Geomorphology of debris flows and alluvial fans in Grand Canyon National Park and their influences on the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona [Ph.D.

Dissertation]: Tucson, University of Arizona, p. Glen Canyon Dam has altered flow and fine sediment (sand, silt, and clay) dynamics of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Before the dam, the Colorado River experienced highly variable flows and carried a large amount of sediment through Grand Canyon, which maintained sandbars (highly valued camping areas in Grand Canyon) and provided sand that protected archeological and cultural sites.

The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is America’s greatest geologic wonder. Shaped by erosion of the Colorado River and its tributaries, the Canyon offers a landscape of grand-in-themselves side canyons, buttes, mesas and plateaus, with an unprecedented window into 2 billion years of Earth history.

Carbonate boulders transported down steep tributary channels by debris flow came to rest on Holocene debris fans beside the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

Weakly acidic rainfall and the metabolic activity of blue-green algae have produced roughly hemispheric dissolution pits as much as 2-cm deep on the initially smooth surfaces of the boulders. Lava Falls Rapid is the most formidable reach of whitewater on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon and is one of the most famous rapids in the world.

Although the rapid was once thought to be controlled by the remnants of lava dams of Pleistocene age, Lava Falls was created and is maintained by frequent debris flows from Prospect Canyon.

We used historical photographs, of which were. Inthe Glen Canyon Environmental Studies Program in cooperation with the Department of Biology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff (NAU), began a long-term study of the benthic dynamics of the Colorado River and its tributaries located in the Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP), Coconino and Mohave counties, Arizona.

June 26 - July 2, Western River Expeditions. Get this from a library. Dating prehistoric tributary debris fans, Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona with implications for channel evolution and river navigability.

[Richard Hereford; Kathryn S Thompson; Kelly J Burke; Geological Survey (U.S.),; United States. Bureau of Reclamation.]. Carbonate boulders transported down steep tributary channels by debris flow came to rest on Holocene debris fans beside the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

Weakly acidic rainfall and the metabolic activity of blue-green algae have produced roughly hemispheric dissolution pits as much as 2-cm deep on the initially smooth surfaces of the boulders. The average depth of dissolution Cited by: 8. FLOW REGULATION, GEOMORPHOLOGY, AND COLORADO RIVER MARSH DEVELOPMENT IN THE GRAND CANYON, ARIZONA1 LAWRENCE E.

STEVENS2 National Park Service, P.O. BoxGrand Canyon, Arizona USA JOHN C. SCHMIDT Department of Geography and Earth Resources, Utah State University, Logan, Utah USA TINA J.

AYERS. |a Frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon |h [electronic resource] / |c [Robert H. Webb, Peter G.

Griffiths, Tillie A. Klearman] ; prepared in cooperation with the Grand Canyon. Havasu Creek joins the Colorado River at River Mile and is very similar to the Little Colorado River in water chemistry and physical habitat, and has fewer non-native fish predators than other Grand Canyon tributaries or the Colorado River.

In anda total of juvenile humpback chub were translocated to Shinumo Creek. @article{osti_, title = {Aggradation and degradation of alluvial sand deposits, toColorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona}, author = {Schmidt, J.C. and Graf, J.B.}, abstractNote = {Alluvial sand deposits along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park are used as campsites and are substrate for vegetation.

Adventurous travelers can also look forward to taking advantage of the oft-overlooked and ideal fall rafting conditions in the western U.S., especially on multi-day river trips in Utah like the Green River through Desolation Canyon and Colorado River through Cataract Canyon in Canyonlands National Park.

Colorado River in Grand Canyon (Howard and Dolan, ). Large boulders are transported to and deposited on the fans at the mouths of tributary streams by debris flows (Webb et al., ; Melis et al., ). Because the river is unable to move the debris except during floods, the channel is constricted, forming rapids and zones of.

Since the completion of Glen Canyon Dam inthe amount of sand supplied to Grand Canyon National Park has been reduced by more than 90 percent. The Paria River, a tributary to the Colorado River 15 miles downstream from the dam, is now the single most important supplier of sand to the Colorado River within the Park.

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